Upcoming Episode

48 Suzy Bogguss

This week, world renowned country music recording artist Suzy Bogguss performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with Suzy. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Onus Morrison demonstrating the traditional dance fiddle technique of playing with “fiddle sticks.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the first in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “The Boy That Burned in the Berryville Jail.”

Best known for her country music hits in the 80’s and 90’s, Suzy Bogguss is an old time musician and fan at heart. Her 2011 release American Folk Songbook testified to this, and featured her versions of “Shenandoah, Banks of the Ohio, and Rock Island Line” among others. Now enjoying her “post stardom” career, and taking things at a decidedly and much welcomed slower pace, we caught up with Suzy for a feature performance at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. And yes, there are a few of her hits from the 80’s and 90’s in for good measure.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Onus Morrison demonstrating the traditional dance fiddle technique of playing with “fiddle sticks,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins presents the first of three episodes on Ozark regional ballads. This episode features a recording of “The Boy That Burned in the Berryville Jail,” also called “Floyd Eddings,” sung by Ed Alford of Delmar, Arkansas on January 3, 1960. The recording was made by University of Arkansas folklorist Mary Parler, and is preserved in the University of Arkansas Ozark Folk Collection.
digitalcollections.uark.edu/cdm/singlei…/4193/rec/9

Radio from the Ozarks by People who Live There

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music, jam sessions and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark. In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners on a musical journey with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories and history of the Ozark region. From popular annual festivals to fun music workshops, there’s always a song in the air in the Ozarks.

You’re invited to be a part of the Ozark Highlands Radio audience. Shows run Thursday through Saturday (Mid-April through the end of October). Stay tuned for our 2017 show line up, so you can start planning your visits.

Admission to most evening shows is $12 and all seating is general admission, available the day of the show. Nightly concerts start at 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. A few select performances will be all reserved seating, so watch our calendar for more information. Book a room at the Cabins at Dry Creek and check out the southern-style cooking at the Skillet Restaurant. Give us a call to learn about discounted combination tickets to Ozark Folk Center State Park and the Arts & Craft Village, annual festivals, season passes and other packages at 800-264-3655.


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Tune in to these listener-supported/public radio stations:

KUAR: Little Rock, AR
FRI 8 p.m. 89.1FM
KASU: Jonesboro, AR
SAT 2 p.m. 91.9FM
KUAF: Fayetteville, AR
Sat 6 p.m. 88.9 FM
KFFB: Fairfield Bay, AR
SUN 6 a.m. 106.1FM
KSMU: Springfield, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 91.1 FM
K255AH: Joplin, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 98.9 FM
KSMW: West Plains, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.3 FM
K204FX: Mountain Grove, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 88.7 FM
KKRN: Round Mountain, CA
SAT 12 Noon 88.5 FM
KSMS: Point Lookout/Branson, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.5 FM
K279AD: Neosho, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 103.7 FM
WETSHD2: Johnson City, TN
WED 9 p.m. and SAT 9.a.m. ET. 89.5 FM


Hosted by Dave Smith

Dave moved to Stone County in 1972 at the age of twenty and began attending the old-time musicals at Lonnie Lee’s house in the community of Fox. He was completely captivated by the old songs and tunes. He would spend Saturday night at Lonnie’s and the rest of week learning what he had heard. He plays guitar, fiddle, claw-hammer banjo, button accordion, and along with Robert and Mary Gillihan, he’s part of the musical group Harmony.

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Recent Episodes

47 Bobby & Ruthie

This week, new fashioned folk duo Bobby Glendy & Ruthie Haynie perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. A performance from the traditional family folk trio “Love Holler.” Also, interviews with Bobby & Ruthie, and also with “Love Holler.” Mark Jones offers an archival recording of famed songwriter & Ozark folklorist Jimmy Driftwood, playing a traditional instrument called the “picking bow.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the last in a series of three Ozark song catchers, Max Hunter.

Bobby Glendy is a second generation guitarist who learned his love of music from his father. A long-time collaborator with many musicians in the Ozark region, Bobby is one of the finest flat pickers in the area and has a rich, resonate singing voice. Paired up with Ruthie Haynie, (vocals) the duo performs classic and traditional material with attention to detail and authenticity.

Emma and Caroline Russell are among the next generation of outstanding young Ozark musicians. The sisters have crafted a truly unique and heartfelt vocal harmony style that is unrivaled. Raised on the music of the Carter Family and other traditional sounds, Emma and Caroline (guitar/banjo) are joined by their father, Tracy on bass to form the group Love Hollar. The name, Love Hollar, references a geographical location near their home in Batesville, Arkansas. Their sound is real and without pretension. They sing and they do it VERY well.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of the famed songwriter & Ozark folklorist Jimmy Driftwood, playing a traditional instrument called the “picking bow,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins presents the last of three episodes on Ozark song catchers, the Springfield, Missouri collectors. This episode features a recording of Gordon McCann, Glenn Rickman, and Missy Pearce in a traditional Ozark jam session at Crane, Missouri, on December 16, 1978. The recording was made by song collector Gordon McCann, and is preserved by Missouri State University’s Meyer Library in its online collections.
digitalcollections.missouristate.edu/cdm4/i…&REC=2



46 The Vogts Sisters

This week, seraphic modern folk duo “the Vogts Sisters” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with the Vogts Sisters. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Arkansas native Uncle Floyd Holland, singing the song “Suzy Licked the Ladle.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second in a series of three Ozark song catchers, John Quincy Wolf.

With haunting harmonies and wickedly creative songs, the Vogts Sisters (Maggie and Abigail) are relative new comers to the old time/acoustic music scene. While they draw from traditional instrumentation (guitar/fiddle/mandolin) and source material, their song repertoire is mostly original and features themes of coming of age in small town America. Harmony singing among family members is always something special and unique; it’s a sound and feel that comes from familiarity and unspoken communication. The Vogts stand out in a crowded field of similar performers, with a fresh sound from America’s Heartland.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of beloved Stone County, Arkansas native Uncle Floyd Holland, singing the humorous folk song “Suzy Licked the Ladle.” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second of three Ozark song catchers, John Quincy Wolf. This episode features a recording of Owen Harvel performing the traditional song “Bad Companions” at Lunenburg, Arkansas on July 2, 1952. The recording was made by collectors John Quincy Wolf Jr. and his wife Bess, and is preserved by the Lyon College Regional Studies Center in its John Quincy Wolf Jr. Collection.
web.lyon.edu/wolfcollection/son…arvellbad1231.html



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