Upcoming Episode

17 Harmony

This week, the accomplished traditional folk trio “Harmony” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with the trio “Harmony,” folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical sojourn into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of the Ozark folk singer Kay Thomas.

Harmony has been a mainstay on the Ozark Folk Center Stage for many years. Their vocals, as one might suspect, center around stellar three part harmony. The group features the talents of Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith on vocals, guitar, and fiddle among other instruments. Husband & wife duo Robert and Mary Gillihan round out the trio, and are multi instrumentalists as well. Mary plays both bass and autoharp, while Robert covers the guitar and mandolin.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft. This episode focuses on the population and cultural impacts of the Ozark Folk Center State Park on the Stone County, Arkansas region.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of the genuinely talented Ozark folk singer Kay Thomas, performing a beautiful arrangement of the traditional song “All Ye Fair and Tender Ladies,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Radio from the Ozarks by People who Live There

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music, jam sessions and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark. In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners on a musical journey with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories and history of the Ozark region. From popular annual festivals to fun music workshops, there’s always a song in the air in the Ozarks.

You’re invited to be a part of the Ozark Highlands Radio audience. Shows run Thursday through Saturday (Mid-April through the end of October). Stay tuned for our 2017 show line up, so you can start planning your visits.

Admission to most evening shows is $12 and all seating is general admission, available the day of the show. Nightly concerts start at 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. A few select performances will be all reserved seating, so watch our calendar for more information. Book a room at the Cabins at Dry Creek and check out the southern-style cooking at the Skillet Restaurant. Give us a call to learn about discounted combination tickets to Ozark Folk Center State Park and the Arts & Craft Village, annual festivals, season passes and other packages at 800-264-3655.


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Tune in to these listener-supported/public radio stations:

KUAR: Little Rock, AR
FRI 8 p.m. 89.1FM
KASU: Jonesboro, AR
SAT 2 p.m. 91.9FM
KUAF: Fayetteville, AR
Sat 6 p.m. 88.9 FM
KFFB: Fairfield Bay, AR
SUN 6 a.m. 106.1FM
KSMU: Springfield, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 91.1 FM
K255AH: Joplin, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 98.9 FM
KSMW: West Plains, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.3 FM
K204FX: Mountain Grove, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 88.7 FM
KKRN: Round Mountain, CA
SAT 12 Noon 88.5 FM
KSMS: Point Lookout/Branson, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.5 FM
K279AD: Neosho, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 103.7 FM
WETSHD2: Johnson City, TN
WED 9 p.m. and SAT 9.a.m. ET. 89.5 FM

WTIP: Grand Marais, MN
SUN 11 a.m. 90.7 FM
WBCM/Radio Bristol: Bristol, TN
SUN 2 p.m. WBCM 100.1 WBCM LP


Hosted by Dave Smith

Dave moved to Stone County in 1972 at the age of twenty and began attending the old-time musicals at Lonnie Lee’s house in the community of Fox. He was completely captivated by the old songs and tunes. He would spend Saturday night at Lonnie’s and the rest of week learning what he had heard. He plays guitar, fiddle, claw-hammer banjo, button accordion, and along with Robert and Mary Gillihan, he’s part of the musical group Harmony.

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Recent Episodes

71 Old Ties

This week, Ozark oldtime duo “Old Ties” performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with the members of this eclectic duo, Allison Williams & Willi Carlisle. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Walter Gosser playing the traditional tune “Cripple Creek.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a piece on the uniquely American art form of shape note singing.

Allison Williams and Willi Carlisle were brought together by a passion for old-time music. The duo is best known around these parts as the leaders of monthly square dances at various hotspots throughout Northwest Arkansas. When they aren’t calling dances, Williams and Carlisle gig as “Old Ties.”

A native of the Arkansas Ozarks, Allison Williams got her start as a punk rock musician before rediscovering her musical roots. Several years in the mountains of North Carolina educated her in Appalachian banjo techniques, especially the fast distinctive styles of Hobart Smith and Wade Ward. Allison has toured internationally, sharing stages with Rhonda Vincent, Donna the Buffalo, and many other giants of the new roots music scene. Her solo CD ”Give Me the Roses” came out in the autumn of 2008, featuring driving arrangements of traditional old-time songs as well as eclectic originals, woven together by a talented backing band of rising stars: alumni of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Old Crow Medicine Show, and the Wiyos, among others. Since then, Allison has toured internationally, playing to a sold-out Barbican Hall in London as part of the BBC’s “Folk America” special, and backing folk legend Michelle Shocked on her 2010 East Coast tour.

Willi Carlisle has, according to one reviewer, "an authenticity it takes some songwriters years to achieve." After years of collecting folklore, playing or calling square dances, and working in the avant-garde, Willi Carlisle is a multi-faceted writer, performer and instrumentalist. With a style forged in the fire of Ozark oldtime and an ever-growing collection of antique musics, Carlisle’s multi-instrumental stories hoot, stomp, and saunter through joys and troubles uniquely Southern and timelessly true. Equally comfortable on banjo, fiddle and guitar, Carlisle has earned accolades for his versatility with performances at the Ozark Folk Center, the Fayetteville Roots Festival, Thacker Mountain Radio, and Fringe Festivals across the country.

 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Walter Gosser playing the traditional tune “Cripple Creek,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.


70 Adam Fudge

This week, Ozark guitarist, singer, and master of the three finger banjo Adam Fudge performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with Adam. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of harmonica player & Ozark original Lou Alderman playing the traditional tune “Danny Boy.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Arkansan & country music superstar Patsy Montana, through the lens of archivist Bill McNeil.

Born and raised in the rich musical culture of the Arkansas Ozarks, Adam Fudge has pursued the legacy of his native mountain music with tenacity and a deep love for the traditional. Adam is a fine singer and guitarist playing traditional country & bluegrass, but his true love is the three finger style of banjo popularized by bluegrass legend Earl Scruggs. Adam has won numerous awards for his incredible banjo skills, both in Arkansas and at the traditional music proving grounds of Winfield, Kansas. As well as possibly being one of the greatest three finger banjo players alive today, his guitar skills and Jimmie Rogers style vocals are finely tuned as well. On this show, Adam performs with a variety of musicians including his brother bassist Shane Fudge, bluegrass legend Dave Brancecum, old time fiddler Roger Fountain, guitar guru Brad Apple, educator & multi-instrumentalist Bill Nesbitt, and prolific bassist Gresham McMillon.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of harmonica player & Ozark original Lou Alderman playing the traditional tune “Danny Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.



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