Upcoming Episode

55 Sad Daddy

This week, original Ozark Old Time folk minstrel and songwriting group “Sad Daddy” performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with these interesting and innovative songwriters. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend Bookmiller Shannon, playing the traditional song “Shortnin’ Bread.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the first in a series of three Ozark Civil War Ballads, “The Battle of Wilson’s Creek.”

“Sad Daddy” combines the talents of four unique Arkansas musicians in one convenient package. The group features Brian Martin on guitar, Melissa Carper on bass, Joe Sundell on banjo, and Rebecca Patek on fiddle. Sad Daddy performs all original material, and their songs have the unique quality of sounding familiar yet new at the same time. Music fans in these parts are notoriously very selective about “new” or “original” music. Suffice it to say, Sad Daddy easily won over a tough room. Oh, and the name? Guitarist Brian Martin tells the story of an old Arkansas backwoods man who’s common refrain to something in less than a good state of operation….”that’s one Sad Daddy….”

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend and dance banjo maven Bookmiller Shannon, playing the traditional song “Shortnin’ Bread.” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the first of three Ozark Civil War ballads. This episode features a 1958 archival recording of Doney Hammontree, singing the Ozark Civil War ballad “The Battle of Wilson’s Creek,” A somewhat humorous ballad sung from the perspective of one of those German soldiers – the “Dutch” as their American neighbors mistakenly called them – “The Battle of Wilson’s Creek” is basically a battlefield variant of any number of songs poking fun at immigrants in the nineteenth century. The recording is preserved in the Max Hunter Collection at Missouri State University.

Radio from the Ozarks by People who Live There

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music, jam sessions and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark. In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners on a musical journey with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories and history of the Ozark region. From popular annual festivals to fun music workshops, there’s always a song in the air in the Ozarks.

You’re invited to be a part of the Ozark Highlands Radio audience. Shows run Thursday through Saturday (Mid-April through the end of October). Stay tuned for our 2017 show line up, so you can start planning your visits.

Admission to most evening shows is $12 and all seating is general admission, available the day of the show. Nightly concerts start at 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. A few select performances will be all reserved seating, so watch our calendar for more information. Book a room at the Cabins at Dry Creek and check out the southern-style cooking at the Skillet Restaurant. Give us a call to learn about discounted combination tickets to Ozark Folk Center State Park and the Arts & Craft Village, annual festivals, season passes and other packages at 800-264-3655.


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Tune in to these listener-supported/public radio stations:

KUAR: Little Rock, AR
FRI 8 p.m. 89.1FM
KASU: Jonesboro, AR
SAT 2 p.m. 91.9FM
KUAF: Fayetteville, AR
Sat 6 p.m. 88.9 FM
KFFB: Fairfield Bay, AR
SUN 6 a.m. 106.1FM
KSMU: Springfield, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 91.1 FM
K255AH: Joplin, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 98.9 FM
KSMW: West Plains, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.3 FM
K204FX: Mountain Grove, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 88.7 FM
KKRN: Round Mountain, CA
SAT 12 Noon 88.5 FM
KSMS: Point Lookout/Branson, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.5 FM
K279AD: Neosho, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 103.7 FM
WETSHD2: Johnson City, TN
WED 9 p.m. and SAT 9.a.m. ET. 89.5 FM


Hosted by Dave Smith

Dave moved to Stone County in 1972 at the age of twenty and began attending the old-time musicals at Lonnie Lee’s house in the community of Fox. He was completely captivated by the old songs and tunes. He would spend Saturday night at Lonnie’s and the rest of week learning what he had heard. He plays guitar, fiddle, claw-hammer banjo, button accordion, and along with Robert and Mary Gillihan, he’s part of the musical group Harmony.

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Recent Episodes

54 Grace Stormont

This week, original Ozark Alternative Folk music ingenue Grace Stormont performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with this fast rising new folk artist. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of the Junior Rackensack Society, singing the Jimmy Driftwood song “Down in the Arkansas.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the Brockwell School, and its tradition of education in the uniquely American art form of shape note singing.

One of the most exciting and talented young musicians in Arkansas, Grace Stormont is just getting started. After moving to Mountain View, Arkansas a few years ago to immerse herself in the local music scene, Grace has made a name for herself among a long list of outstanding musicians. A multi-instrumentalist (bass, guitar, banjo and dulcimer,) sixteen year old Grace also excels as a vocalist and interpreter of traditional Ozark ballads. Her musical phrasing and insight are well beyond her age. Aside from her solo performances, which are featured on this program, Grace also performs with the incredible all female group “Pretty Lil Miss.”

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of the Junior Rackensack Society, singing the Jimmy Driftwood song “Down in the Arkansas,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the Brockwell School, located in Brockwell, Arkansas, and its tradition of education in the uniquely American art form of shape note singing. This episode features an archival recording of Orgel Mason and a gospel quartet singing the traditional song “It’s a Mighty Hard Road to Travel.”


53 The Steel Wheels

This week, Shenandoah Valley, Virginia progressive folk roots Band “The Steel Wheels” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with the band, and Mark Jones “From the Vault” segment.

The Steel Wheels are a four piece acoustic band that combines the instrumentation and song structure of traditional Old Time music with a modern sensibility and drive. Performing together since 2010, The Steel Wheels hail from the rich musical grounds of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia. The band sponsors and organizes an annual music festival, held in the lush Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, called the “Red Wing Roots Music Festival.”

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark original Doug Ward performing the traditional song “The Fox,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.



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