Upcoming Episode

52 Roy Bookbinder

This week, old time acoustic blues legend Roy Book Binder performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with this celebrated legacy of the Reverend Gary Davis style of acoustic guitar blues. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark youth Dwight Moody singing the traditional classic, “In the Pines.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Skeeter Walden.

Guitarist Roy Book Binder has traveled the world as a solo performer for nearly 50 years. Roy’s career and playing style is heavily influenced by the late Reverend Gary Davis, who specialized in a unique style of guitar finger picking. Roy’s performances are as much a story of his life and experiences as they are a musical endeavor.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1973 recording of Ozark youth Dwight Moody singing the traditional classic, “In the Pines,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Skeeter Walden. This installment features archival recordings of the classic fiddle tunes “Woody’s Hornpipe, Puncheon Floor, and Natchez on the Hill.”

Radio from the Ozarks by People who Live There

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music, jam sessions and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark. In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners on a musical journey with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories and history of the Ozark region. From popular annual festivals to fun music workshops, there’s always a song in the air in the Ozarks.

You’re invited to be a part of the Ozark Highlands Radio audience. Shows run Thursday through Saturday (Mid-April through the end of October). Stay tuned for our 2017 show line up, so you can start planning your visits.

Admission to most evening shows is $12 and all seating is general admission, available the day of the show. Nightly concerts start at 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. A few select performances will be all reserved seating, so watch our calendar for more information. Book a room at the Cabins at Dry Creek and check out the southern-style cooking at the Skillet Restaurant. Give us a call to learn about discounted combination tickets to Ozark Folk Center State Park and the Arts & Craft Village, annual festivals, season passes and other packages at 800-264-3655.


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Tune in to these listener-supported/public radio stations:

KUAR: Little Rock, AR
FRI 8 p.m. 89.1FM
KASU: Jonesboro, AR
SAT 2 p.m. 91.9FM
KUAF: Fayetteville, AR
Sat 6 p.m. 88.9 FM
KFFB: Fairfield Bay, AR
SUN 6 a.m. 106.1FM
KSMU: Springfield, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 91.1 FM
K255AH: Joplin, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 98.9 FM
KSMW: West Plains, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.3 FM
K204FX: Mountain Grove, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 88.7 FM
KKRN: Round Mountain, CA
SAT 12 Noon 88.5 FM
KSMS: Point Lookout/Branson, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.5 FM
K279AD: Neosho, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 103.7 FM
WETSHD2: Johnson City, TN
WED 9 p.m. and SAT 9.a.m. ET. 89.5 FM


Hosted by Dave Smith

Dave moved to Stone County in 1972 at the age of twenty and began attending the old-time musicals at Lonnie Lee’s house in the community of Fox. He was completely captivated by the old songs and tunes. He would spend Saturday night at Lonnie’s and the rest of week learning what he had heard. He plays guitar, fiddle, claw-hammer banjo, button accordion, and along with Robert and Mary Gillihan, he’s part of the musical group Harmony.

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Recent Episodes

51 Hoot & Holler

This week, alternative folk duo “Hoot & Holler” performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with the talented duo. A performance and interviews from “The Ozark Banjo Company.” Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Walter Gosser singing the rare traditional classic, “Jimmy Brown the News Boy.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Lon Jordan.

“Hoot n’ Holler” are comprised of guitarist Mark Kilianski and fiddler Amy Alvey. Like our other performers this week, their partnership has roots at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA. Born from a love of American folk music, nurtured in Boston's burgeoning string band scene, and inspired by the authenticity and enduring spirit of traditional Appalachian mountain music, “Hoot & Holler” hit the road full time in 2016 while living in their camper van “Irene.” Their tender harmonizing and songwriting comes across as simple, honest, and fresh to the ears. Described as the perfect cross section of soulful grit and polished technique, you can expect the full range of dynamics when performing traditional and original old time fiddle tunes. Like a sonic cross-country road trip, you can hear the soundscapes from different parts of the country in their original songs: from the dirgy Louisiana swamp to the stark and sparse beauty of a Southwestern desert.

“The Ozark Banjo Company’s” Eden Forman (fiddle) and Lukas Pool (banjo) share a deep passion for old time and traditional American music. The two met while studying at Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA. Eden studied fiddle with Darol Anger and Bruce Molsky. She finds her musical home in American old time fiddle music, but her repertoire extends into many directions. Lukas grew up in Mountain View, Arkansas in the Ozark Mountains where he started playing banjo at the age of 12. Most nights were spent on the courthouse square with his friends and family learning and growing with the sounds of Ozark music. Lukas has had the honor of winning the national old-time banjo championship twice and has returned to Berklee as a guest professor. The pair now resides in Mountain View, Arkansas where they own and operate the Ozark Banjo Co. which specializes in creating handmade traditional and custom banjos.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Walter Gosser singing the rare traditional classic, “Jimmy Brown the News Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives. This 1973 recording also features Guyman Gammill and Dean Hinesley on guitars.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Lon Jordan. This installment features archival recordings of the classic fiddle tunes “Wake Up Jacob and Let's Go A Hunting, Granny Will Your Dog Bite, Fever River, and The Bluebird Waltz.”


50 The Quebe Sisters

This week, talented Texas trio The Quebe Sisters perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with the Quebe Sisters. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Betty Copeland singing a rare traditional gospel classic, “Life’s Railway to Heaven.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the last in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “Little Johnny Lee.”

Masters of Texas style swing, fiddle and three voice harmony, the Quebe (kway-bee) Sisters bring it like few can. Like other family and sibling performers we’ve featured on Ozark Highlands Radio, the Quebe Sisters (Grace, Sophia and Hulda) have formed a sound and style that is both traditional and familiar, yet all their own. Each sister an accomplished fiddle player and singer, the trio specializes in western swing tunes with their signature three part harmony.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original and family music legacy Betty Copeland singing a rare traditional gospel classic, “Life’s Railway to Heaven,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins presents the last of three episodes on Ozark regional ballads. This episode features a recording of the traditional Ozark ballad “Little Johnny Lee,” sung by Bessie Owens of Batesville, Arkansas on April 6, 1958. The recording was made by folklorist Mary Parler, and is preserved in the Ozark Folksong Collection of the University of Arkansas Libraries Digital Collections.
digitalcollections.uark.edu/cdm/singlei…/3286/rec/5



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