Upcoming Episode

79 Jason Roberts Band

This week, two time Grammy Award winning Texas Swing fiddler and Asleep at the Wheel member Jason Roberts & the Jason Roberts Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with Jason. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of four Ozark originals; Buddy Lancaster, Tom Simmons, Jackie Stewart, and of course Mark Jones performing “Bile Them Cabbage Down.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a profile of the Shawnee residents of the Ozark region.

Grammy Award winning fiddle player Jason Roberts brings his signature style to the Jason Roberts Band. 
Having spent his childhood among legends in Texas honky-tonks -- and then nearly 20 years with the world-famous band Asleep at the Wheel -- Jason has soaked up the very best of Western Swing and brings his own signature style to this traditional American genre. Two Grammy Awards and four individual Hall of Fame inductions later, Jason and his Jason Roberts Band delight fans around the world.

Music is a family thing in the Roberts clan.  Jason’s grandfather, Buck Roberts, a fellow Texas Western Swing Hall of Famer, toured nationally with The Roberts Brothers Rhthymaires in the 1940’s and 50’s.  A 12-year-old Jason eventually fronted a band with his grandfather and other Rhthymaires’ veterans.  From the other side, Jason’s grandmother played swing piano well past her 100th birthday.  Jason learned to play on his grandfather Carl’s fiddle, an instrument that’s on stage with him to this day.

Legendary fiddler Johnny Gimble (Jason’s kin by marriage) took notice of young Jason's remarkable natural talent and took him under his wing. Jason has said, “Every good lick I know, I stole from Johnny Gimble.” By the time he was 15, Jason had played with greats like Gimble, Leon Rausch, Bobby Boatwright, Herb Remington, and other members of Bob Wills’ Texas Playboys.

From the White House to The David Letterman Show and the Kennedy Center to Bob Wills’ hometown of Turkey, Texas, Jason has helped keep the spirit of Western Swing alive across generations. His fiddle magic and endearing personality make him a fan favorite everywhere he plays.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of four Ozark originals; Buddy Lancaster, Tom Simmons, Jackie Stewart, and of course Mark Jones performing “Bile Them Cabbage Down,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft. This episode focuses on the history of the Shawnee Indian inhabitants of the Ozark region.

Radio from the Ozarks by People who Live There

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music, jam sessions and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark. In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners on a musical journey with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories and history of the Ozark region. From popular annual festivals to fun music workshops, there’s always a song in the air in the Ozarks.

You’re invited to be a part of the Ozark Highlands Radio audience. Shows run Thursday through Saturday (Mid-April through the end of October). Stay tuned for our 2017 show line up, so you can start planning your visits.

Admission to most evening shows is $12 and all seating is general admission, available the day of the show. Nightly concerts start at 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. A few select performances will be all reserved seating, so watch our calendar for more information. Book a room at the Cabins at Dry Creek and check out the southern-style cooking at the Skillet Restaurant. Give us a call to learn about discounted combination tickets to Ozark Folk Center State Park and the Arts & Craft Village, annual festivals, season passes and other packages at 800-264-3655.


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Tune in to these listener-supported/public radio stations:

KUAR: Little Rock, AR
FRI 8 p.m. 89.1FM
KASU: Jonesboro, AR
SAT 2 p.m. 91.9FM
KUAF: Fayetteville, AR
Sat 6 p.m. 88.9 FM
KFFB: Fairfield Bay, AR
SUN 6 a.m. 106.1FM
KSMU: Springfield, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 91.1 FM
K255AH: Joplin, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 98.9 FM
KSMW: West Plains, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.3 FM
K204FX: Mountain Grove, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 88.7 FM
KKRN: Round Mountain, CA
SAT 12 Noon 88.5 FM
KSMS: Point Lookout/Branson, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 90.5 FM
K279AD: Neosho, MO
SUN 8 p.m. 103.7 FM
WETSHD2: Johnson City, TN
WED 9 p.m. and SAT 9.a.m. ET. 89.5 FM

WTIP: Grand Marais, MN
SUN 11 a.m. 90.7 FM
WBCM/Radio Bristol: Bristol, TN
SUN 2 p.m. WBCM 100.1 WBCM LP
KODK: Kodiak, AK
TUE 7 a.m. 90.7 FM
WEJP: Wheeling WV
TH 9 p.m. 107.1 FM


Hosted by Dave Smith

Dave moved to Stone County in 1972 at the age of twenty and began attending the old-time musicals at Lonnie Lee’s house in the community of Fox. He was completely captivated by the old songs and tunes. He would spend Saturday night at Lonnie’s and the rest of week learning what he had heard. He plays guitar, fiddle, claw-hammer banjo, button accordion, and along with Robert and Mary Gillihan, he’s part of the musical group Harmony.

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Recent Episodes

78 A.J. Croce: Two Generations of American Music

This week, American singer-songwriter and musical legacy A.J. Croce recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Hear A.J. speak of getting to know his famous musical father, Jim Croce, through his inherited collection of personal archival recordings. “A.J. Croce: Two Generations of American Music,” is a blend of A.J’s own soulful music, his father’s enduring hit songs, and some of the music that they shared as influences, together. It is a glimpse into the life of one of America’s greatest songwriters and his equally talented progeny.

Adrian James "A.J." Croce is an American singer-songwriter. He is the son of singer-songwriters Jim Croce and Ingrid Croce.

“According to Willie Nelson, “A.J. Croce has wisdom beyond his years. With his music, he represents his generation with a profound sense of honesty in his lyrics and quality in his delivery. The future of entertainment is safe in his hands!”

Some artists are afforded the chance to tell their personal stories as they see fit, at a particular moment when they know the time has come. But for many, there is no choice — the story emerges hardwired to the music and they become forever identified with it no matter how their story may evolve or change.

A.J. Croce has been inextricably linked to a version of his own story by virtue of his name. He’s experienced a lifetime of comparisons to a father he lost at age two, whose music bears little resemblance to his own output yet still serves as a reference point despite the years that have passed and the many iconic mentors who have stepped in to offer their counsel, creativity, and endorsement throughout his long career.

It’s curious that it now feels necessary to include the reference, as enough time has passed that a new generation of tastemakers and journalists might not know who Jim Croce was — that he was a golden-voiced everyman, a singer-songwriter-guitarist who died too soon, leaving one of pop music’s most beautiful and memorable ballads (written about a young A.J.) in his wake.

Croce the younger, on the other hand, is a piano man, first and foremost, and a vocal stylist second. His muted growl pulls from a host of American traditions and anti-heroes — it’s part New Orleans, part juke joint, part soul, but somehow evokes New York, a continuum where John Lurie meets Lou Reed. He is further a songwriter, driven by a personal muse, informed by a life on a boomerang of tragedy.”


77 The Keisler Brothers Band

This week, traditional bluegrass & Ozark legends The Keisler Brothers Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with this talented band of brothers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of harmonica virtuoso Lonnie Glosson performing “Mama, I Want a Drink of Water.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a brief history of settlers to the Ozark region.

The Keisler Brothers Band is comprised of Redmond, Randy and Rick Keisler, as well as their long time friend Rodney Heslep. This traditional bluegrass group has been bringing their fiery brand of acoustic music to American audiences for four decades. Redmond Keisler, the leader of the group, plays Dobro, while his brothers Randy and Rick play bass & guitar, respectively. The brothers’ long time compatriot Rodney Heslep brings the all important three finger banjo to round out a perfect traditional high energy bluegrass sound. One of the Keisler Brothers’ specialties is their razor sharp harmony singing. Family harmonies are breathtaking to behold, and this family has been perfecting theirs for decades. True, honest, and decidedly down home, a Keisler Brothers show is a testament to their traditional bluegrass legacy.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of harmonica virtuoso Lonnie Glosson performing “Mama, I Want a Drink of Water,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft. This episode focuses on the history of early white settlers to the Ozark region, and their impact on the indigenous cultures of the area.



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