Upcoming Episode

38 "The Upjumpers"

This week, original Ozark Old Time stringband “The Upjumpers” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. A performance from the unique Canadian Contra dance band “Maivish,” as well as interviews with “The Upjumpers.” Also, Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark Original Elliot Hancock, singing the traditional song “Hole in the Stocking.”

Two families combine to form one special group. That’s the uncomplicated secret to the sound of “The Upjumpers.” A collaboration of the Pool family: Scott (guitar;) Shay (fiddle;) and daughter Rebecca (cello;) and the McCools: Jackie (bass;) Crystal (fiddle;) and Lillyanne (claw hammer banjo,) the band has deep family ties and a strong sense of community. “The Upjumpers” performs traditional mountain music including vocal selections and fiddle tunes.

Each year, the Ozark Folk Center State Park hosts the annual Folk Dance Days weekend. As part of the entertainment, a house band is hired for the weekend to provide music for traditional contra dancing events. “Maivish" explores time-honored melodies and songs with traditions from the British Isles, Ireland and America. The group is a collaboration between American fiddler Jaige Trudel and British born guitarist Adam Broome, and includes Matthew Olwell on flutes, bodhrán, and percussive dance.

Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” drawing from interviews & perspectives of various folk musicians.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark Original Elliot Hancock, singing the traditional song “Hole in the Stocking,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.


Radio from the Ozarks by People who Live There

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark. In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners on a musical journey with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories and history of the Ozark region.

You’re invited to be a part of the Ozark Highlands Radio audience. Shows run Wednesday through Saturday (April 15- October 1) and Tuesday through Saturday in the month of October. Check out our 2016 show line-up. Admission to most evening shows is $12 and all seating is general admission, available the day of the show. Nightly concerts start at 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. A few select performances will be all reserved seating, so watch our calendar for more information. Book a room at the Cabins at Dry Creek and check out the southern-style cooking at the Skillet Restaurant. Give us a call to learn about discounted combination tickets to Ozark Folk Center State Park and the Craft Village, season passes and other packages at 800-264-3655.



  • Tune in to:

  • KUAR: Little Rock AR
    FRI 8 p.m. 89.1FM
  • KASU: Jonesboro AR
    SAT 2 p.m. 91.9FM
  • KUAF: Fayetteville AR
    Sat 6 p.m. 88.9 FM
  • KFFB: Fairfield Bay AR
    SUN 6 a.m. 106.1FM

  •  
  • KSMU: Springfield MO
    Sun 8 p.m. 91.1 FM
  • K255AH: Joplin MO
    Sun 8 p.m. 98.9 FM
  • KSMW: West Plains MO
    Sun 8 p.m. 90.3 FM
  • K204FX: Mountain Grove MO
    Sun 8 p.m. 88.7 FM

  •  
  • KSMS: Point Lookout/Branson MO
    Sun 8 p.m. 90.5 FM
  • K279AD: Neosho MO
    Sun 8 p.m. 103.7 FM


Hosted by Dave Smith

Dave moved to Stone County in 1972 at the age of twenty and began attending the old-time musicals at Lonnie Lee’s house in the community of Fox. He was completely captivated by the old songs and tunes. He would spend Saturday night at Lonnie’s and the rest of week learning what he had heard. He plays guitar, fiddle, claw-hammer banjo, button accordion, and along with Robert and Mary Gillihan, he’s part of the musical group Harmony.

Recent Episodes

37 Clark Family Trio

This week, the unique and inimitable Clark Family Trio, accompanied by virtuoso guitarist Bill Nesbitt, performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Performances from the youthful Old Time string band “Possum Juice,” as well as interviews with the Clark Family and Possum Juice members. Also, Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith, singing the classic Stephen Foster song “My Old Kentucky Home.”

Family bands always have that extra bit of bonding (sometimes even tension) that makes the music more compelling. The Clark Family Trio consists of mother Cindy on bass/vocals, daughters Sophie and Sally Ann on lead and harmony vocal, with guitarist Bill Nesbit rounding out the “trio.” Natives of Arkansas and stalwarts in the Stone County music scene, the Clarks cover a wide variety of material from traditional to modern, all with a signature family harmony.

Comprised from some of Stone County’s finest youth musicians, “Possum Juice” is a traditional string band that features Oakley Smith on fiddle, Kai Perry on mandolin, Alana Brewer on guitar and Judy Munn on bass. The group specializes in traditional Ozark fiddle tunes and other instrumental music common to the area.

Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” drawing from interviews & perspectives of various folk musicians.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith, singing the classic Stephen Foster song “My Old Kentucky Home,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.


36 Ruby Pines

This week, the talented and versatile Ruby Pines performs with a variety of great musicians, including her father Larry Snyder, live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with Ruby Pines, Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Judy Husky, singing the classic song “Let’s All Go Down to the River.”

Rachel Kempf (aka Ruby Pines) had an unassuming musical introduction at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. At one time she worked as a front desk assistant. Rachel made mention to another park employee that she did “some singing” on the side. We’re quite glad that conversation happened. Now a married mother of four, Rachel still performs at the OFCSP regularly, covering a wide range of musical styles. As “Ruby Pines” she performs traditional music of the region in a group that includes her father, Larry Snider on banjo. With “Romantics” the leanings are toward more traditional jazz standards.

Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” drawing from interviews & perspectives of various folk musicians.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark original Judy Husky, singing the classic song “Let’s All Go Down to the River,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.



VIEW MORE

Image Gallery

  • Carolyn Carter

  • Poor Valley Girls

  • Riders in the Sky

  • Roe Family Singers